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Scaled-down farm bill has some farmers concerned

(AP) — Kansas farmers remain leery of the scaled-down farm bill passed by the U.S. House as they wait to see what actually makes it into law. But the competing

Kansas Farm Bureau president Steve Baccus

Kansas Farm Bureau president Steve Baccus

versions for now preserve the one thing most cherished here — crop insurance subsidies.

Kansas Farm Bureau president Steve Baccus says the bill is good for Kansas agriculture.

It maintains conservation programs and keeps export market development and assistance programs that promote U.S. agricultural products overseas. And most importantly, he says the bill keeps the crop insurance program.

But gone from both the House and Senate versions of the bill are subsidies that are paid regardless whether a recipient farms or not.

Kansas farmers collected $927 million in agricultural subsidies last year.

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  • http://www.hayspost.com No $

    We are way way way in debt……pretty tough to subsidize when we don’t have the money to start with :(

  • A

    Im mixed on subsidizes, I understand that mother nature can wipe out a whole years worth of income. But also if you cant make a living without the government paying you to do it, then find a different occupation.

    • Great Idea

      Hey A, that’s a great idea. Why don’t all farmers just change occupations, and you can go ahead and produce your own food.

      • A

        I farm, I have never taken a subsidies. I also grow my own food.

  • Share the Burden

    In times of economic crisis, there is a burden that faces the people and it is time that everyone starts to share to feel the squeeze. Education and social services have bled enough for the state. They are always the first to receive the cuts and are never replenished. Big business, industry, commerce, politicians and yes farmers rarely have government cutbacks in regards to subsidies or funding. It’s time they felt the economy along with everyone else. Let’s not make this a middle class only problem.

    • From a farmer

      You bring up a great point. Let’s go ahead and start cutbacks on the farm bill subsidies. Does anyone even know where the biggest portion of the farm bill goes? Just FYI, its not going to the farmers.

  • Joe Friday

    “Share the Burden”…I would like to respectfully request that you seek to find the truth, the facts, before you make statements that are not factual. The spending in the “Farm Bill” that goes to those who do not “farm” is well over 75% of the spending in the bill. In Ellis County there is more money sent to entities from programs in the nutrition title than there is spending sent to farmers in the commodity title. The facts will show you that actual non-nutrition title spending has been cut more than 150% while nutrition title spending has risen more than 300% in the last two “farm bills”.