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Governor Signs Eight More Bills Into Law Thursday, Vetoes One

brownback

Topeka – Kansas Governor Sam Brownback signed eight bills into law Thursday, bringing the total number of bills signed by the governor during the 2013 Legislative Session to 76. He also vetoed one bill, Senate Bill 37.

SB 37 would have repealed the sunset of the Kansas Home Inspectors Professional Competence and Financial Responsibility Act that is set to expire on July 1, 2013.

In his veto message to the Kansas Legislature, Governor Brownback shared his concerns about whether the potential harm inflicted upon the citizens of Kansas by unscrupulous home inspectors warrants the expansion of government and increased regulation that was applied in 2008 to this segment of the private sector.

“Upon review of the materials provided by the proponents of this legislation, both in 2008 and 2013, I see little evidence of large numbers of Kansas citizens being economically harmed by home inspectors. In fact, even the proponents believe the vast majority of Kansans who provide this service are honest people. Therefore, it appears the legislation passed in 2008 may simply add unnecessary fees and regulations to law abiding citizens,” Gov. Brownback wrote.

The Governor also noted that it appears the board lacks the resources and expertise to effectively regulate home inspectors in Kansas and that the Kansas Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division is better equipped with its professional staff experienced in conducting investigations and assisting Kansans seeking reimbursement.

In his veto message, Governor Brownback acknowledged the Legislature’s support of the board and told lawmakers he would sign a similar bill that extended the sunset for two years so there would be time for further consideration and discussion whether to continue the board.

The bills signed into law today by the Governor are:

SB 1 reduces the frequency of financial management practice audits of the State Treasurer’s Office and the Pooled Money Investment Board (PMIB) from every year to every two years. In addition, the new law requires a transition audit within two weeks of a new State Treasurer taking office.

SB 27 makes more U.S. military veterans eligible for the state’s Military Service Scholarship Program by expanding the definition of “qualified student”.

SB 56 transfers the responsibility of recognizing official county fair associations from the Kansas Department of Agriculture to the board of county commissioners of the county where the association is located.

SB 81 makes several changes to the Kansas Open Records Act (KORA), including exempting home addresses or home ownership records from searchable websites of officers, judges, and prosecuting attorneys, at their request. The new law prohibits a public agency from disclosing the name, home address, e-mail address, phone numbers, or other contact information for any person licensed to carry concealed handguns, any person who has enrolled in or completed weapons training for concealed carry licensure, or any person who has applied for a concealed carry license.

SB 120 establishes a central registration of farmers’ markets through the Kansas Farmers’ Market Promotion Act. The voluntary registration will be used to encourage and promote farmers’ markets across Kansas and assist the Kansas Department of Agriculture in promoting Kansas agriculture by more efficiently connecting producers with consumers.

SB 128 extends the sunset of the Postsecondary Technical Education Authority by three years, to June 30, 2017 and clarifies students taking part in the Career Technical Education (CTE) Incentive Program must complete their certificates prior to high school graduation or by Dec. 31 immediately following graduation for a school district or community/technical college to receive an incentive award.

SB 136 allows a veteran to have “VETERAN” printed on the front of a state-issued driver’s license or non-driver identification card.

HB 2170 makes numerous changes to sentencing, post-release supervision, and probation statutes, including allowing low-risk defendants who’ve paid all restitution and met all terms of probation to be eligible for discharge from court supervision.

KSKollection
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